Assessment of existing trees

Introduction | Assessment of existing trees | Tree limbs overhanging private property | Damage to private infrastructure by trees under Council's responsibility | Possible termite/pest activity in trees | Tree maintenance | Tree maintenance by residents | Planting of new trees | Requests for new trees | Identification of need | Selecting the right location for your new tree | Preferred species | Preferred species list | Tree planting and tree care

Assessment of existing trees

Whether as part of a routine inspection or as a result of a request from a resident/landowner, trees will be assessed by a suitably qualified officer or contractor of Council to determine the most appropriate course of action based on community health, safety and liability risks and available resources. Council will not always remove a tree because it is undesirable or a weed species. Council will evaluate each individual tree based on its significance, heritage value, health and vigour and impact on its surrounding landscape.

Generally, tree maintenance will not be carried out in situations where the tree is:
  • In a healthy condition with no predictable tree or branch failure
  • Not interfering with utility services
  • Not interfering with motorists’ line of sight
  • Not causing major damage to public or private property
  • Not causing risk to public safety
The following reasons will not be considered when assessing trees for removal/pruning:
  • Leaf, fruit, flower, seed, twig, bark or other litter build-up on private buildings or yards
  • Enhancement of views
  • Improvement of street lighting to private property
  • Increase of sunlight to dwellings including solar panels. However, consideration may be given to allow thinning of the canopy in trees on public land to improve the amount of sunlight into dwellings or onto solar panels where:
    • Any thinning of the canopy of the tree will not affect the amenity of the road or recreation space in which the tree is growing;
    • The approved percentage of thinning to the canopy of the tree will not adversely impact on the health and vigour of the tree;
    • All work on the tree is undertaken by a contractor approved by Council;
    • The cost of the work by the contractor is paid by the applicant directly to the contractor.
  • Reduction in bird droppings or resin falling from the tree (except where there is a significant health risk associated with the issue)
  • Disturbance to private infrastructure by tree roots (see further notes below)
  • Proposed erection of a fence or because the tree causes, or will cause, damage to a fence
  • Unidentified bushfire hazard